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SPAY/NEUTER


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34 replies to this topic

#1
Diana C.

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It is amazing to me how many people have no clue about the danger of not having your pet S/N. I was also one of those people (years ago).  I always had my animal S/N without knowing the dangers, just did not want the male cats to spray, my  female dogs/cats get pregnant etc.

Now when I speak to people and they tell me that their dog/cat is not S/N I immediately inform them about the dangers and send them an email with IMOM's information about the importance of having your animal Spayed/Neutered.   It is up to each one of us to inform our family and friends of the DANGERS of not having their animal fixed.

Jacki's message:

The position IMOM takes on spay and neuter is very well known. There is absolutely no reason it's OK not to spay and neuter your pets.

For years we have heard about the pet over population. That continues to be a problem. Our rescue and shelter friends can tell you horror stories about all the young animals who are homeless. Some have to die before they even know what it’s like to have a family and be loved.

While IMOM is concerned about the pet over population, there is another issue that deeply concerns us. It concerns us to the point that we are now sending out letters to veterinarians asking them to council their clients on the health risks for animals who are not spayed and neutered. Some are already doing that. Those who are not need to start.

IMOM’s mission is to help with financial aid to any companion animal in need of non routine veterinary care – and to also educate the public in matters concerning the welfare of animals. Because of our mission we have seen a lot of pets suffer, and even die, needlessly.

In this forum you will read about those animals who suffered needlessly. Some did not survive. They died horrible deaths.

The Facts:
Behavior problems top the list of reasons for pet relinquishment. <a href="http://www.hsus.org/ace/11799" target="_blank">http://www.hsus.org/...g/ace/11799</a>
Male dogs are hit by cars, or otherwise injured having "escaped" because of a nearby female in heat. Neutered male dogs won't run after a female in heat.
Spaying eliminates the possibility of uterine or ovarian cancer and greatly reduces the incidence of breast cancer, particularly when your pet is spayed before her first estrous cycle.
Neutering eliminates testicular cancer and decreases the incidence of prostate disease.
Spaying and neutering can eliminate or reduce the incidence of a number of health problems that can be very difficult or expensive to treat.
Neutering eliminates the tendency of male cats and dogs to "mark" their property
Spaying can also prevent mammary gland tumors, the most common tumor in unspayed female dogs and the third most common tumor in cats. They are more common in dogs than in humans. A high percentage of mammary tumors are cancerous: in dogs, nearly 50%; in cats, nearly 90%. Once a cancerous mammary tumor spreads to the bones or lungs, the cancer will be fatal. An unspayed dog is 200 times more likely to develop mammary tumors than a dog spayed before her first heat. An unspayed cat is 7 times more likely than a spayed cat to develop mammary tumors.
Female dogs and cats:~ The risk of mammary tumors for dogs spayed before their first heat is 0.05%. This risk increased to 8% after one heat cycle, and 26% after the second heat. ~ Cats who are spayed prior to one year of age have a 0.6% risk of developing mammary carcinomas compared with intact cats.

Diana & Angel
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#2
sweetpea

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animcndc_sm.gif

I actually think I am getting somewhere with Petsmart regarding; promoting the danger of "not" having your pet spay or nuetered!  aktion033.gif

Keep you posted!

Jenny

Edited by sweetpea, 07 November 2007 - 12:54 PM.


#3
pixi

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Hi, I am new to this site.  I am doing a research project on the importance of sterilizing pets.  I decided to do my project on this topic because there are so many people who are misinformed about the whole subject.  In doing my research so far, I have found a great many organizations across the country that offer free sterilization for pets AND feral cats.  I think that it is the most important thing an owner can do for their pet.
If this is still a current forum, could anyone with other info (the links listed already have been great) respond?  I need to get some info from a forum/blog as part of my assignment... catwatching.gif

#4
birdie girl

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I grew up in Vermont.  A state where not a lot of people spay/neuter their pets.  On Aug 21, 1996 one of my Mom's cats had kittens.  My husband and I adopted two of them, Heather a blue/grey tortoise shell and Gizmo a black/orange tortoise shell.  We did not have them spayed.  Both cats moved cross country with us when we moved to Arizona in late 1998.
Last May I was sitting with Heather, than almost 11 y/o, on the sofa rubbing her tummy, something she usually did not like.  And I felt some lumps.  A trip to the vets the next day confirmed my worst fears.  Heather had breast cancer.
I am a stay at home house wife.  Health problems do not allow me to work.  My husband works hard to support me and my many furry children and to pay my medical bills.  So we do not have a lot of extra money.  
But some how we scraped up the almost $1000.00 to pay for the test and her surgery.  Heather had a mastectomy and was spayed later that week.
Heather has been cancer free for almost a year now and will celebrate her 12 birthday in August.  But I am still riddled with guilt.  If I had known, if I had had her spayed, she would not have had to suffer through this.  And neither would I.  The vet informed me that if I had Heather spayed as a kitten she almost certainly would never have gotten sick.

PLEASE SPAY/NEUTER YOUR PETS.  For their sake and for yours.
~~Kimberly~~


Because the heart beats under a covering of hair, of fur, feathers, or wings, it is, for that reason, to be of no account? ~Jean Paul Richter

#5
Guest_Linda IMOM_*

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HSUS has several videos posted on this website http://www.stoppuppymills.org/.  There aren't too horrible to look at - well, I have seen much much worse -

#6
Anuk

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Spaying and Neutering became *my* special cause. It is the condition of adoption through Pennsylvania shelters that animals are either adopted through shelters/rescues already spayed or neutered or will be spayed and neutered within a set time period after adoption. With proof (copy of the veterinary receipt) of the spaying and/or neutering to be provided back to the adopted shelter within a certain set time period.

When talking with people about the need to S/N - I am continually amazed with the amount of excuses people are willing to provide or believe about 'why they don't need to S/N'
Continually the subject of *cost* arises. Yet there exists many low cost S/N resources within our city. The procedures, cost-wise are certainly 'cheaper' than the health complications that can arise from not spaying or neutering. Certainly cheaper than dealing with the feeding and routine veterinary care for a queen with kittens or complications in the queen's pregnancy or complications with the kittens.

People too often don't understand that when they adopt through a shelter, they are getting a *bargain* regardless of whatever 'adoption fee' is charged. They are getting a S/N animal, who has received veterinary care and has been tested for and vaccinated against their species common diseases. The adopted animal has also been de-wormed, de-ticked and de-flead.

When Nuk approached us, un-neutered, unclaimed and sick with 3 types of worms, within his first 2 weeks with us, the costs for his veterinary care had already doubled what Sweets' adoption fee was.

Edited by Anuk, 21 May 2008 - 09:26 AM.


#7
jodinjeff

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I'm very curious about one issue and I'd LOVE feedback from others. I run the Purrs & Puppy Breath Nursery, Inc. in San Angelo, TX. It is our policy that ALL animals in our care will be sterilized BEFORE they can go to a new home. NO EXCEPTIONS. My question is this: How do you feel about Pediatric spays/neuters? Our animals are usually sterilized at 6 weeks of age. They must weigh at least one pound as well. I know that I've encountered a lot of people who adamantly disagree with Pediatric sterilization. They claim it is detrimental to the animal's health and shortens their lifespan. I do not agree at all. The only thing that I personally can say with any certainty is that I'm sure there is a higher risk of anesthesia complications when dealing with Pediatric animals versus more mature animals. In our area, it has been proven that the majority of the population (human) will NOT follow through and get their newly adopted pet sterilized when they reach the accepted age of 4 months. 4 months is the age I believe most of our local Vets are willing to sterilize pets for members of the public. But, for myself (the Nursery) and for our local very high kill Animal Shelter, we are the exceptions. We can get our animals done as young as 6 weeks of age. Again, I'm really just curious how others feel about this issue. Thanks!

#8
CatPaws

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QUOTE (jodinjeff @ Nov 9 2008, 08:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm very curious about one issue and I'd LOVE feedback from others. I run the Purrs & Puppy Breath Nursery, Inc. in San Angelo, TX. It is our policy that ALL animals in our care will be sterilized BEFORE they can go to a new home. NO EXCEPTIONS. My question is this: How do you feel about Pediatric spays/neuters? Our animals are usually sterilized at 6 weeks of age. They must weigh at least one pound as well. I know that I've encountered a lot of people who adamantly disagree with Pediatric sterilization. They claim it is detrimental to the animal's health and shortens their lifespan. I do not agree at all. The only thing that I personally can say with any certainty is that I'm sure there is a higher risk of anesthesia complications when dealing with Pediatric animals versus more mature animals. In our area, it has been proven that the majority of the population (human) will NOT follow through and get their newly adopted pet sterilized when they reach the accepted age of 4 months. 4 months is the age I believe most of our local Vets are willing to sterilize pets for members of the public. But, for myself (the Nursery) and for our local very high kill Animal Shelter, we are the exceptions. We can get our animals done as young as 6 weeks of age. Again, I'm really just curious how others feel about this issue. Thanks!


I personally favor pediatric spay/neuter, as does the rescue group for whom I foster.  We include the spay/neuter as part of our adoption fee and the spay/neuter is done by the veterinarian that works with our group.  The judgment call on whether the animal is ready for spay/neuter is done by our veterinarian.   When the vet decides there is a reason not to do the spay/neuter, we make arrangments with the adopter to have the pet brought back in a couple months. If we have any reason to believe the animal will not be brought back for the spay/neuter, we shut down the adoption.  We refuse to drop the adoption fee, partly as a deterrent to those who would decide to forego the spay/neuter as a cost savings.

I use to be against pediatric spay/neuter until I experienced for myself that the majority of animals did so much better with pain post-op.  Yes, there have been a few that crashed under anesthesia, but in all of the cases I have seen, there is a strong likelihood the animal would have crashed even if the spay was held off for later.   It is terribly heartbreaking for the foster parent when this happens, but I find comfort in knowing an adopter was spared this pain, and was not turned off to the fact that many healthy animals are waiting to be adopted in local shelters and rescue groups.

A veterinarian who is a strong advocate of pediatric spay/neutering for cats told this to me- so I urge you to confirm this with your own veterinarians.  He claims there is a serious difference in the estrus cycles of cats and dogs.  Unlike dogs who have set estrus cycles, a cat will continue cycling into heat UNTIL she becomes pregnant.  So, for cats, it's not a matter of whether she will get pregnant- it's a matter of when.  When you couple that with pyometra, I think it provides a pretty strong argument for pediatric spay/neutering.   The unspayed female also represents a danger to stray male cats in the area, as they will respond to her marking, howling and estrus scents.  Cat fights/bites is how FeLV is spread.

Edited by CatPaws, 09 November 2008 - 06:11 PM.

HELP JUST ONE

Love, from AJ's Pride and Skeeter's Joy

#9
jodinjeff

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Thank You CatPaws for taking the time to post a response. I am an advocate of the Pediatric sterilization and we also refuse to adopt any animal out until AFTER it has been sterilized. And...I wholeheartedly agree about the pain issue. I know this will be less than well-received when I say this publicly but....I also offer adopters the option of having their new lifelong companion (feline only of course) front declawed at the same time it is sterilized. I am NOT pro declawing. I am pro choice. On a personal level, all of my feline pets are front declawed. But, I do NOT advocate declawing as a rule. I leave it up to the adopter and the decision is not theirs alone to make. I have a big say so on the issue depending on the adopters current situation. Sometimes they are too stupid to be allowed to have a declawed cat. LOL!! Anyway, in regards to declawing with a Pediatric animal...Man oh man...There is NO comparison in the pain department when comparing that baby to an older animal. The kittens I've had declawed at 6 weeks of age are literally completely back to "normal" the day after the surgery. It blows my mind.

#10
magyarlany

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I guess I'm one of the few crazy fools that don't care as much about my furniture as my cats. (but I cheat...I have IKEA furniture, when one sofa covers gets shredded, I can replace the cover....not the whole sofa.)

#11
jodinjeff

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QUOTE (magyarlany @ Nov 9 2008, 11:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I guess I'm one of the few crazy fools that don't care as much about my furniture as my cats. (but I cheat...I have IKEA furniture, when one sofa covers gets shredded, I can replace the cover....not the whole sofa.)



Well...Like I said....I know that the issue of declawing is very controversial and I don't normally discuss it (kind of like religion or politics) but, I really just wanted to make the point about the pain factor when comparing Pediatric animals to mature animals.

#12
Jacki IMOM

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QUOTE
Unlike dogs who have set estrus cycles, a cat will continue cycling into heat UNTIL she becomes pregnant.


I didn't know that!  catwatching.gif
I remember when I started to learn about all the health risks for pets who are not s/n.  It wasn't until I started IMOM and we had our first pyometra case.  We have always tried to educate people on this matter but sometimes it feels like all we're doing is preaching to the choir.  

Everytime we get a pyo case, I cringe, and think about how the pet must be suffering.  And it could have been prevented with a simple procedure.  A procedure that is FAR less expensive than surgery when they have pyo.

I would like to see a day when all vets include s/n as part of an initial exam.  Just like testing for HW in dogs and FIV in cats.
Jacki and Magic, IMOM Founders


Pyometra is a serious uterine infection that is potentially fatal and can occur in unspayed animals. Spay and neuter -- it's the right thing to do!




#13
Lynette

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My rescue vet will sputer at 2#'s/2 months.  I do let kittens go without sputer but I don't leave it up to the adopter to bring them back.  I make the appointment then notify the adopter when I will be picking the pet up (I know where they live as I do home deliveries) and bringing it back after the surgery.  I always do it the day before so I can be sure the baby will be NPO (nothing per os...mouth) after midnight the day before surgery.

Declaw?  OMG!!!  I will try and contain myself as I realize that most people presently on this forum do not know me and I don't want to be off putting.

The declaw procedure is equivelent to having all of our fingers amputated at the first digit.  Think about it!

The only time it would be even slightly acceptable is if the pet were going to an elderly person or someone with a clotting disorder or some other health issue.  My advice - get a hampster as I would not adopt to anyone like this.  We have this question in our adoption application:  Do you plan to declaw this cat?  If the applicant answers Yes, we politely tell them that we have already taken several applications on this particular cat and we will notify them if they have been accepted.

Oh yeah - with regard to estrus in cats it's true.  I have heard that in very cold climates, cats will not go into estrus because it's less likely for the litter to survive.  I don't know if this is true but I know that cats have kittens year round here in CA.

Edited by Lynette, 13 November 2008 - 05:02 PM.


#14
jodinjeff

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Declaw? OMG!!! I will try and contain myself as I realize that most people presently on this forum do not know me and I don't want to be off putting.

The declaw procedure is equivelent to having all of our fingers amputated at the first digit. Think about it!

The only time it would be even slightly acceptable is if the pet were going to an elderly person or someone with a clotting disorder or some other health issue. My advice - get a hampster as I would not adopt to anyone like this. We have this question in our adoption application: Do you plan to declaw this cat? If the applicant answers Yes, we politely tell them that we have already taken several applications on this particular cat and we will notify them if they have been accepted.

Well Lynette, I appreciate you "containing yourself" with regards to the issue of declawing. Honestly, it is not my desire to debate the issue with anyone in this forum. To me, it is purely a matter of personal preference as to whether a cat is front declawed or not. Forgive me if what I'm about to say is offensive but, in my opinion, declawing a cat is no different than having a son circumsized. It is a cosmetic procedure and can have benefits if you choose to believe it. The one thing I've learned over the past several years is that the people who are the most vehemently against declawing are also the ones who revel in the concept of shocking potential adopters with "horror stories" and "gruesome pictures" that they've managed to scour the internet to obtain simply to justify their disapproval of the whole procedure. I've watched many declaws being performed. It is not nearly as barbaric as many people think it is or have been led to believe that it is. Yes, there are always horror stories that are true. But, the same can be said about everything in life. I respect your choice. I simply ask the same in return.

#15
Lynette

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I didn't have to scour the internet for "horror stories" and "grusome pictures" to support my opion on the declaw procedure.

I volunteer for the LASPCA and their data shows that the majority of declawed cats dumped at their shelters are done so due to negative behaviors brought on by the declaw of that animal.

Maybe you could educate me, jodinjeff, on the "benefits" that I should choose to believe in.

Spay and Neuter your pets!!!

#16
LaurieR

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QUOTE (jodinjeff @ Nov 13 2008, 02:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
To me, it is purely a matter of personal preference as to whether a cat is front declawed or not.


We have had a number of discussions here on the forum about declawing. And yes, it is a polarizing topic, just like politics and religion, and I certainly hope that this discussion does not turn unpleasant, because we are all here at IMOM because we want to help pets in need.

But I did feel the need to respond to this comment, because you say "it's purely a matter of personal preference." Unfortunately, a declawed kitty is never given this consideration. I doubt it would be their personal preference to have their toes amputated up to the first knuckle, which can cause serious pain -- which is sometimes chronic and life-long.

There are many sites on the web that discuss declawing. Yes, some have gruesome photos -- but that's the reality of the declawing procedure. I encourage anyone wanting to really understand what declawing is about to do a little research online, and educate themselves about this topic.

#17
jodinjeff

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QUOTE (Lynette @ Nov 16 2008, 10:20 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I didn't have to scour the internet for "horror stories" and "grusome pictures" to support my opion on the declaw procedure.

I volunteer for the LASPCA and their data shows that the majority of declawed cats dumped at their shelters are done so due to negative behaviors brought on by the declaw of that animal.

Maybe you could educate me, jodinjeff, on the "benefits" that I should choose to believe in.

Spay and Neuter your pets!!!


Lynette, under no circumstances will I enter into a "debate" with you or anyone else about declawing. You've made it very clear that you have a belief and I've learned over the years that those who have already made up their minds cannot be told anything to "sway" them. You have every right to believe what you choose to believe. All I've asked is that you show the same respect to me and allow me to have my beliefs. At no time have I tried to "argue" in this forum or preach that declawing should be done. Nor do I intend to do so.

Jodi

#18
jodinjeff

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QUOTE (Laurie IMOM @ Nov 16 2008, 11:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We have had a number of discussions here on the forum about declawing. And yes, it is a polarizing topic, just like politics and religion, and I certainly hope that this discussion does not turn unpleasant, because we are all here at IMOM because we want to help pets in need.

But I did feel the need to respond to this comment, because you say "it's purely a matter of personal preference." Unfortunately, a declawed kitty is never given this consideration. I doubt it would be their personal preference to have their toes amputated up to the first knuckle, which can cause serious pain -- which is sometimes chronic and life-long.

There are many sites on the web that discuss declawing. Yes, some have gruesome photos -- but that's the reality of the declawing procedure. I encourage anyone wanting to really understand what declawing is about to do a little research online, and educate themselves about this topic.


I will not post anything else in this forum regarding declawing. It is not worth it. Everyone has the right to believe and feel the way they choose to. My experiences regarding declawing obviously have no merit when discussing the issue with anyone who has already made up their minds that it is the wrong decision. So, again, this will be my last post with declawing as the topic. I am sorry that my point of view is upsetting and I am even more sorry if my beliefs have caused anyone any upset. It is not my intent to stir things up in this forum. I'm sorry I even brought it up.

Jodi

#19
Kim

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If we can get back to the original question about pediatric S/N.......

We spay/neuter kittens at 8 wks and 2 lbs, but sometimes when feral kittens are trapped it's hard for the caretaker to judge if they meet the 2 lb criterion so we have on occasion done kittens under 2 lbs.  We leave that judgment call to the vets.  

In my experience, the kittens do fine.  In fact, they have an easier time of it than the older kittens and adults in the sense that they come out of anesthesia faster.  Obviously we adjust the amt of anesthesia given.  Also, we don't fast them as long before surgery and we feed them sooner after surgery so they don't get hypoglycemic.  Vets have told me they prefer doing the kittens at a young age because they don't have to cut through as much body fat and the cat's not in heat (or pregnant).  I think neuter-before-adoption is a must.  

QUOTE (CatPaws @ Nov 9 2008, 10:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A veterinarian who is a strong advocate of pediatric spay/neutering for cats told this to me- so I urge you to confirm this with your own veterinarians.  He claims there is a serious difference in the estrus cycles of cats and dogs.  Unlike dogs who have set estrus cycles, a cat will continue cycling into heat UNTIL she becomes pregnant.


I've never heard this before and I don't think it's true.  Is it possible the vet told you that a cat stops cycling as soon as she's impregnated?  (which is true).  That's not the same as saying that she will cycle continuously until she's pregnant.  

Take a look at this article, which talks about breaks between heat cycles:  
http://vetmedicine.about.com/od/pregnancyb.../Cat_estrus.htm

You're quite right, though, that cats are prolific breeders and we've seen kittens in heat as young as 4 mo of age.  So very good reasons for pediatric S/N.  

Also wanted to slightly correct this statement:  "Cat fights/bites is how FeLV is spread."  Feline Leukemia (FeLV) can be spread by fighting but it can also be spread by cats grooming each other and even by sharing food bowls and litter boxes.  See the Cornell Feline Health Center FAQ Sheet:  Cornell -- FeLV.  
The virus that is primarily spread by bite wounds is Feline AIDS (FIV).  



#20
k9sign

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Here in north central OH we checked around, and we got the same response (except from one rescue we contacted), abt neutering the 2 LBK's that were  'dumped' on our property. They all said they needed to be 3 months and 3 lbs. The one rescue said they do it at 2 months and 2 lbs.
I would have preferred the 2 months and 2 lbs.
Posted Image

#21
CatPaws

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I think in the context of pediatric spay/neutering, the vet was trying to explain a biological difference between cats and dogs.

A young couple had found a kitten around Thanksgiving.  They were pleasantly surprised when she suddenly turned "extremely affectionate" around Valentine's Day."  They were not aware of the signs that would indicate a kitten was in heat-- and they thought she was way too young to have reached that time.  HO HO!
They were having a fit trying to keep her inside, and she had suddenly started peeing outside of the litterbox in corners near the window.  When he explained she was in heat and she would need to be spayed -- they thought it wasn't romantic to do at Valentine's Day. He was warning them it wasn't going to be another six months before they'd have to deal with the behaviours again (in addition to the health concerns) "You can lead a horse to water..."

When researching for a "birth control pill" that would work on animals- cats presented a problem because of the reversal in their cycles-- impregnation then ovulation.

Guidelines here are healthy, 8 weeks, and 2.5 lbs.

Edited by CatPaws, 21 November 2008 - 06:58 AM.

HELP JUST ONE

Love, from AJ's Pride and Skeeter's Joy

#22
lkachlic

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QUOTE (jodinjeff @ Nov 9 2008, 08:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm very curious about one issue and I'd LOVE feedback from others. I run the Purrs & Puppy Breath Nursery, Inc. in San Angelo, TX. It is our policy that ALL animals in our care will be sterilized BEFORE they can go to a new home. NO EXCEPTIONS. My question is this: How do you feel about Pediatric spays/neuters? Our animals are usually sterilized at 6 weeks of age. They must weigh at least one pound as well. I know that I've encountered a lot of people who adamantly disagree with Pediatric sterilization. They claim it is detrimental to the animal's health and shortens their lifespan. I do not agree at all. The only thing that I personally can say with any certainty is that I'm sure there is a higher risk of anesthesia complications when dealing with Pediatric animals versus more mature animals. In our area, it has been proven that the majority of the population (human) will NOT follow through and get their newly adopted pet sterilized when they reach the accepted age of 4 months. 4 months is the age I believe most of our local Vets are willing to sterilize pets for members of the public. But, for myself (the Nursery) and for our local very high kill Animal Shelter, we are the exceptions. We can get our animals done as young as 6 weeks of age. Again, I'm really just curious how others feel about this issue. Thanks!

I have always wondered how organizations/breeders/animal shelters could s/n at such a young age.   I have been a vet tech for 3 years now and have seen several botched pediatric s/n.  In some instances, both testicles had not descended and the owner had to pay for a 2nd neuter.  Some of the botched spays affected the pet's bladder control as well as leaving a very hideous scar on the abdomen.  The reason vets recommend 4 months of age is for several reasons:  1) the level of maturity they will be at compared to 6 weeks.  At 6 weeks, they are usually (esp. in small breeds, referring to dogs mostly) extremely difficult to operate on, plus they risk crashing.  Since at this stage in their development, they are more prone to hyperglycemia and anemia, vets prefer to wait until 4 months.  2) The bleeding during the surgery is kept to a minimum.  If s/n at 6-8 weeks, there is usually a lot more bleeding associated with s/n.  If there is too much bleeding during surgery, they can run the risk of getting anemia as a biproduct of the surgery.   3) This may be obvious, but it is easier to make sure everything that is supposed to get taken out does.  When they are 6-8 weeks old, it is difficult to distinguish the difference between the internal organs (mostly referring to spays here) due to everything being so small, and therefore they may not remove all that needs to be removed.  We had one patient who had to have a 2nd "spay" to remove a uterine reminent.  Of course, when it comes to pediatric s/n's I am probably extremely biased in my opinion.

#23
devilxkat

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Until my cat got sick and I started looking up possible causes, I had never heard of Pyometra. I had only ever heard the usual cry to spay and neuter your pets to prevent overpopulation and unwanted animals. No mention of the medical complications that could arise. No mention of death. Why isn't this message as common? It's just as, if not more so, important to pet owners.
Now, whether my baby has Pyometra or not, I will make damned sure I let others know of the risks their beloved animals may face by not being fixed.

#24
Kim

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QUOTE (lkachlic @ Apr 1 2009, 05:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have always wondered how organizations/breeders/animal shelters could s/n at such a young age.   I have been a vet tech for 3 years now and have seen several botched pediatric s/n.  In some instances, both testicles had not descended and the owner had to pay for a 2nd neuter.  Some of the botched spays affected the pet's bladder control as well as leaving a very hideous scar on the abdomen.  The reason vets recommend 4 months of age is for several reasons:  1) the level of maturity they will be at compared to 6 weeks.  At 6 weeks, they are usually (esp. in small breeds, referring to dogs mostly) extremely difficult to operate on, plus they risk crashing.  Since at this stage in their development, they are more prone to hyperglycemia and anemia, vets prefer to wait until 4 months.  2) The bleeding during the surgery is kept to a minimum.  If s/n at 6-8 weeks, there is usually a lot more bleeding associated with s/n.  If there is too much bleeding during surgery, they can run the risk of getting anemia as a biproduct of the surgery.   3) This may be obvious, but it is easier to make sure everything that is supposed to get taken out does.  When they are 6-8 weeks old, it is difficult to distinguish the difference between the internal organs (mostly referring to spays here) due to everything being so small, and therefore they may not remove all that needs to be removed.  We had one patient who had to have a 2nd "spay" to remove a uterine reminent.  Of course, when it comes to pediatric s/n's I am probably extremely biased in my opinion.


Perhaps the vets you're working for aren't skilled in pediatric S/N.  I've been a volunteer at a high-volume S/N clinic for 4 years now and we routinely S/N at 8 wks and 2 lbs.  In our experience the younger kittens do better than the older ones:  they're up from anesthesia sooner and they're bouncing around the next day like they never had surgery.  But we also adjust for their age/size by tamping down the amt of anesthesia, not fasting them as long before surgery, feeding them sooner after surgery, and making sure they stay warm.  

We haven't seen the anemia problem you mentioned.  And if both testicles aren't descended, then cryptorchid surgery is done -- there's no reason to have an owner/caretaker bring the cat in later for a 2nd neuter.  I have also never heard our vets comment that there's more bleeding in younger kittens or that it's more difficult to identify their internal organs.  On the contrary, older kittens present challenges in that they have more body fat to cut through, and they're more likely to be in heat (more blood) or to be pregnant.

I support humane groups who do Neuter Before Adoption.  Having vets skilled in pediatric S/N helps the groups to be able to show kittens while they're still little & cute, and adoption turnover frees up foster homes (or shelter cages) to help more animals.

ps)  "Some of the botched spays affected the pet's bladder control as well as leaving a very hideous scar on the abdomen."  A botched spay = an incompetent vet, having nothing to do with the animal's age.

#25
Jacki IMOM

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QUOTE
they thought it wasn't romantic to do at Valentine's Day.


Please tell me you are kidding!!  I thought I had heard all of the excuses but this is a new one.  catwatching.gif
Jacki and Magic, IMOM Founders


Pyometra is a serious uterine infection that is potentially fatal and can occur in unspayed animals. Spay and neuter -- it's the right thing to do!




#26
CatPaws

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QUOTE (Jacki IMOM @ Jun 9 2009, 10:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Please tell me you are kidding!!  I thought I had heard all of the excuses but this is a new one.  catwatching.gif



Not kidding.  I was extremely proud of the vet, for keeping his cool.  She was spayed the following day, and they were given some information on pyometra with a note that read "love means never having to say you're sorry".

HELP JUST ONE

Love, from AJ's Pride and Skeeter's Joy

#27
lightwing

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Well, I have to agree with IMOM on this.

Our little tiny chihuahua Bambi, just underwent a spay, after almost dying from pyometra.  I am not an ignorant person.  I've had dogs and cats all my life, and have always been pro spay/neuter, but, I had NO idea about the dangers of pyometra!  As I've said, I'm not ignorant, I ask questions at the vet's office.  My only knowledge of pyometra has come from people I know having dogs that have had puppies have problems with it!

With Bambi, I asked the vet about it when she had her shots at 8/10 weeks.  He told me that she was so tiny I would have to have a specialist do her spay.  I had not had a cat or kitten in a long time and had no idea that now it is recommended that they be spayed/neutered as kittens!  I think vets need to do a better job of educating pet owners, no question about it.  I don't know what they can be thinking when they do not tell you how important it is to spay/neuter your pet.

I'm kind of angry, because if I had known it was even possible for an unspayed, unbred female dog to get pyometra I would have made it the utmost priority to have her spayed, even if it meant taking her to a specialist (which I have since found out would not have been necessary)!  It never occurred to me that our tiny little dog could get pyometra just from not being spayed; no litters, no breedings, nothing, and she came down with a terrible, life threatening case of pyometra that IMOM saved her from!  

It makes me sad, because there are other animals that could have been helped with the same money, if I had only known that spaying kittens and puppies is routine and that they regularly do them at 2 pounds!  Bambi weighs slightly over 2 pounds.

I am also thinking about my sweet pit bull, that I had a long time before Bambi, who had mammary tumors that had to be surgically removed.   The vet at the time took a biopsy, and from looking at the tissue before he sent it to the pathologist, he was convinced it was cancerous.  We were very lucky because it wasn't cancerous, but I will never forget my poor girl crying all night long because of the pain from that surgery.  I had to get her morphine injections the next morning to even make it bearable.  She actually looked forward to the morphine, and would lick my hand when I came to give it to her.  She knew it was the only thing that would make her feel better.  It was a horrible nightmare I never want to relive.  Now I think it's because I waited until she was older to have her spayed, because the vet told me to wait until after her first cycle.  That was the thinking at the time.

So I can't be more supportive of any and all efforts to get veterinarians to educate people on the reasons to have your pet spayed/neutered!  Are they afraid they will have less work?!  It seems like they would have plenty of work without worrying about the consequences of dogs not being spayed/neutered, the consequences in addition to having too many litters of puppies and kittens and the complications from that for the mama.

Vets should stress it over and over and over, just how important it is to get your pet spayed/neutered.  I wish that I had known about it a very long time ago, it would have saved so much suffering and heartache!

Bambi's mom

#28
NomNamaste

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I'm a bit upset that I can't apply for the funding because my 14 year old cat that needs treatment, isn't neutered. I %100 believe in neutering/spaying, but I inherited my Himalayan cat 2 1/2 years  ago when my uncle passed away and no one would take her in. I was told that age her age, there really was no point in getting her neutered anymore and now most of the organizations I'm applying for have this rule that the cat must be neutered/spayed or have plans to do so. I'm completely stuck with getting my cat help, and I fear that at this point she will end up dying in the long run. Honestly, I give up.

#29
Dawn IMOM

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NomNamaste - at IMOM, it isn't a requirement that your pet is presently spayed/neutered, just that you would agree to have them spayed/neutered if/when medically safe.  Have you begun the application for IMOM yet?
Dawn

#30
Beauty's Kathy

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Hi

I encourage you to place your application with IMOM.   Many years ago, my dog got cancer at the age of 15 because she was not spayed. She did fine after the surgery and lived to be almost 19 years old. If the vet feels the surgery is not safe, you can still get help for her.

When you apply for assistance, ask the vet to include the cost of spay or neuter (if medically safe) with the estimate and the fundraising will include that.

Female that are not spayed can develop pyomtra, which is a serious, life threatening disease.

Please do not five up.  I hope that you are in the process of sending in your documents to get help

IMOM works miracles every day !

Kathy




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