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lkachlic

Importance of s/n's

4 posts in this topic

Hi there!

I am glad to see that someone is getting the word out about s/n your pets. I have been a vet tech for 3 years and here are 2 examples of the importance of getting your pet spayed or neutered. I noticed that most of the examples were for females with pyometra, but I wanted to give some examples beside that.

At the clinic I work for, we had an 8 year old male poodle come in for constipation. He was deficating blood and liquidy stool and seemed to be in extreme pain. We found out that he was not neutered and that he was having difficulty going to the bathroom because his prostate was so enlarged. He had to have an emergency neuter in order to help shrink his prostate. This was my first experience with prostate disease in dogs and found the experience very saddening for the dog. His pain and suffering could have been prevented if his person would have gotten him neutered earlier.

One more example (this does not have a happy ending).

We had a family call for an apointment to bring in their 2 year old chihuahua. We asked what they were coming in for (vax, sick, etc.). They told us that there was a foot sticking out of their dog's rear end and said that it had been like that for 2 days. They brought the pet in and radiographs were done in order to see where the puppy was in the birth canal and how many there were. What was amazing to me about this story is that they did not even know she was pregnant. Whatever their dog mated with, was too big for her to pass naturally. They barely had money for the office visit and radiographs and could not afford the emergency c-section. (Also, the puppy in the birth canal was most likely stillborn since he/she had been in the birth canal for 2 days.) Unfortunately, we had to put her down.

My soapbox for the day:

People who bring their puppies (most cat owners don't say they are going to breed their pets) and say we are not going to s/n because we are going to breed him/her. Why breed when there are so many pets in animal shelters and being euthanized every day?

Sorry such a long rant. Hope this helps get out the word on s/n pets.

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OMG...I can't imagine what that little Chi must have gone through. And a simple spay would have prevented it - and she would still be alive.

In my observation at IMOM for the last 10 years I have found that even a tragedy doesn't always make people understand the health risks for an intact animal. They get other animals and still don't s/n.

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Unfortunately, all you have to do is look at a couple of the other threads on the forum to realize that stupid goes clear to the bone. And not altering is stupid. Course it's a shame that some people aren't spayed or neutered.

Celia

Edited by Rottendogs

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Unfortunately, all you have to do is look at a couple of the other threads on the forum to realize that stupid goes clear to the bone. And not altering is stupid. Course it's a shame that some people aren't spayed or neutered.

Celia

I completely agree on the last part!! And it's true, people just don't get it when comes to s/n. They also don't get it when they bring in their dog with parvo and it dies. They just go out and get another one without properly decontaminating their homes and their new ipet s right back in the office. Most people do not know this, but the parvo virus can remain on hard surfaces for up to 7 years and still have the possibility to infect those that come in contact with it who are not vaccinated.

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