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Diana C.

SPAY/NEUTER

35 posts in this topic

Please tell me you are kidding!! I thought I had heard all of the excuses but this is a new one. :catwatching:

Not kidding. I was extremely proud of the vet, for keeping his cool. She was spayed the following day, and they were given some information on pyometra with a note that read "love means never having to say you're sorry".

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Well, I have to agree with IMOM on this.

Our little tiny chihuahua Bambi, just underwent a spay, after almost dying from pyometra. I am not an ignorant person. I've had dogs and cats all my life, and have always been pro spay/neuter, but, I had NO idea about the dangers of pyometra! As I've said, I'm not ignorant, I ask questions at the vet's office. My only knowledge of pyometra has come from people I know having dogs that have had puppies have problems with it!

With Bambi, I asked the vet about it when she had her shots at 8/10 weeks. He told me that she was so tiny I would have to have a specialist do her spay. I had not had a cat or kitten in a long time and had no idea that now it is recommended that they be spayed/neutered as kittens! I think vets need to do a better job of educating pet owners, no question about it. I don't know what they can be thinking when they do not tell you how important it is to spay/neuter your pet.

I'm kind of angry, because if I had known it was even possible for an unspayed, unbred female dog to get pyometra I would have made it the utmost priority to have her spayed, even if it meant taking her to a specialist (which I have since found out would not have been necessary)! It never occurred to me that our tiny little dog could get pyometra just from not being spayed; no litters, no breedings, nothing, and she came down with a terrible, life threatening case of pyometra that IMOM saved her from!

It makes me sad, because there are other animals that could have been helped with the same money, if I had only known that spaying kittens and puppies is routine and that they regularly do them at 2 pounds! Bambi weighs slightly over 2 pounds.

I am also thinking about my sweet pit bull, that I had a long time before Bambi, who had mammary tumors that had to be surgically removed. The vet at the time took a biopsy, and from looking at the tissue before he sent it to the pathologist, he was convinced it was cancerous. We were very lucky because it wasn't cancerous, but I will never forget my poor girl crying all night long because of the pain from that surgery. I had to get her morphine injections the next morning to even make it bearable. She actually looked forward to the morphine, and would lick my hand when I came to give it to her. She knew it was the only thing that would make her feel better. It was a horrible nightmare I never want to relive. Now I think it's because I waited until she was older to have her spayed, because the vet told me to wait until after her first cycle. That was the thinking at the time.

So I can't be more supportive of any and all efforts to get veterinarians to educate people on the reasons to have your pet spayed/neutered! Are they afraid they will have less work?! It seems like they would have plenty of work without worrying about the consequences of dogs not being spayed/neutered, the consequences in addition to having too many litters of puppies and kittens and the complications from that for the mama.

Vets should stress it over and over and over, just how important it is to get your pet spayed/neutered. I wish that I had known about it a very long time ago, it would have saved so much suffering and heartache!

Bambi's mom

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I'm a bit upset that I can't apply for the funding because my 14 year old cat that needs treatment, isn't neutered. I %100 believe in neutering/spaying, but I inherited my Himalayan cat 2 1/2 years ago when my uncle passed away and no one would take her in. I was told that age her age, there really was no point in getting her neutered anymore and now most of the organizations I'm applying for have this rule that the cat must be neutered/spayed or have plans to do so. I'm completely stuck with getting my cat help, and I fear that at this point she will end up dying in the long run. Honestly, I give up.

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NomNamaste - at IMOM, it isn't a requirement that your pet is presently spayed/neutered, just that you would agree to have them spayed/neutered if/when medically safe. Have you begun the application for IMOM yet?

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Hi

I encourage you to place your application with IMOM. Many years ago, my dog got cancer at the age of 15 because she was not spayed. She did fine after the surgery and lived to be almost 19 years old. If the vet feels the surgery is not safe, you can still get help for her.

When you apply for assistance, ask the vet to include the cost of spay or neuter (if medically safe) with the estimate and the fundraising will include that.

Female that are not spayed can develop pyomtra, which is a serious, life threatening disease.

Please do not five up. I hope that you are in the process of sending in your documents to get help

IMOM works miracles every day !

Kathy

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NomNamaste - at IMOM, it isn't a requirement that your pet is presently spayed/neutered, just that you would agree to have them spayed/neutered if/when medically safe. Have you begun the application for IMOM yet?

My cat is 14 and my vet and I both agree that there is no point in getting her spayed. I couldn't afford getting her spayed anyways ON TOP of the money I'm trying to fundraise for her to just get a diagnosis and then following treatment. I honestly don't see getting help anywhere at this point, and I've only fundraised $100 so far in 4 days. I've asked for my credit to be increased on Care Credit, was denied, called multiple organizations, one didn't have the funds, others again gave me an issue about her being spayed, others were in certain areas only or illness specific. I've put multiple things of mine on Craigslist and Ebay with no bites. I'm just so fed up.

Edited by NomNamaste

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Also, don't I need to get a diagnosis to start the application? Right now, the diagnosis and treatment plan is unknown as we haven't gotten the funds yet to even get her the ultrasound to figure out what is going on in her bladder. Smoosh also has mamary cysts, but according to the Xrays (and the fact they have been there for a long time) the vet doesn't believe it to be cancer, but wants to remove them (if I can get funds for that too) in case they turn into it. My main concern is fixing whatever is in her bladder first, before even going down that route.

Personally, the vet says that she would be fine for a surgery, but I'm not willing to put my cat through potentially three surgeries; one for the bladder, mamarary cysts, and spaying. It's just too much for her age.

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If Smoosh is not spayed, we would include that in the amount we would be fund raising for. She would be able to be spayed while she was having the other surgery if possible. You are correct that IMOM is not able to pay for expensive diagnostic tests, but if you are considering applying for financial aid, send in what you have now - your financial documents and the vet documents. We can't help at all if we don't know the details about your case. Once we know more about your case, we can be more specific about what we can help with.

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Besides possibly surgery on her bladder, is it even possible to do three types of surgeries in one shot? What if my vet decides that one surgery is risky enough and doesn't think being spayed is optional? I'm seeing my vet tomorrow. Once I talk things over with her, I'll get print ups of everything. I don't think I'll know anything about her bladder until the ultrasound, but I can try to get an estimate for spaying as well as how much it would be to remove the mammary growths (if they can).

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I talked to the vet today. With a possible surgery for the mass in her stomach, plus the mammary cysts, she's a bit concnered about too many surgies as my cat is 14 years old and she is FIV positive. She also seems to have a bit of a labored breathing ordeal, but there are no signs based on the Xray that she has cancer, so it isn't causing the breathing thing. We are going to get her tests next week and take it one at a time to figure it all out.

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